2022 in politics and government

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Events pertaining to world affairs in 2022, national politics, public policy, government, world economics, and international business, that took place in various nations, regions, organizations, around the world in 2022.

January[edit]

  • January 1
  • January 10
  • January 14
    • The United States said that the Russian government had deployed saboteurs to eastern Ukraine to stage a fabricated attack on Russian proxy separatists in eastern Donetsk and Luhansk to provide Putin with a pretext for a renewed invasion of Ukraine. The U.S. said that the Russian operatives were trained in urban warfare and explosives.[4][5][6] The Russian government denied seeking a pretext to invade.[6]
  • January 17
    • Beginning in January 2022, the Russians began a slow evacuation of personnel from its embassy in Kyiv; it was unclear if the withdrawals of the personnel were "part propaganda, part preparation for a conflict or part feint" or some combination.[7]
  • January 18
    • By mid-January 2022, a Ukrainian Defense Ministry's intelligence assessment estimated that the Russians had almost completed a military buildup on the Ukrainian border, amassing 127,000 troops in the region (of which 106,000 were Russian Armed Forces land group forces and the remaining being sea and air forces) and further supporting more than 35,000 Russian-backed separatist forces and 3,000 Russian forces in rebel-held eastern Ukraine.[8] The assessment estimated that Russia had deployed 36 Iskander medium-range ballistic missile systems near the Ukrainian borders of Ukraine, each with a range of 500–700 km (310–430 miles), many stationed within striking distance of Kyiv.[8] The assessment also reported intensified Russian intelligence and combat sustainment units, such as movements of ammunition and field hospitals.[8][9]
    • Russian troops were reported to have sent an unspecified number of troops into Belarus. The official reason was to conduct war games with Belarus in the following month, however several officials from Ukraine and the White House stated that the troop presence in Belarus would be used to attack Ukraine from the north, especially since the Ukrainian capital Kyiv is located very close to the Belarusian–Ukrainian border.[10][11][12][13]
  • January 21
    • Lavrov and U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken met in Geneva. Blinken emphasized "was not a negotiation but a candid exchange of concerns and ideas".[14] Following the meeting, Blinken said that the U.S. had made clear to Russia that its renewed invasion would "be met with swift, severe and a united response from the United States and our partners and allies."[15] The U.S. delivered a formal written response to Russia's demands on 26 January. The response rejected Moscow's demand that Ukraine never join NATO. Blinken stated that the documents outlined "concerns of the United States and our allies and partners about Russia's actions that undermine security, a principled and pragmatic evaluation of the concerns that Russia has raised, and our own proposals for areas where we may be able to find common ground."[16]
  • January 22
    • the British government said that Russia was organizing a plan to supplant Ukraine's government via military force and install a pro-Russian puppet administration in the country, potentially led by Yevheniy Murayev, a former member of the Ukrainian parliament.[17][18] Murayev[19] and the Russian government denied the allegation, with the latter blaming the "NATO countries, led by the Anglo-Saxons" for the Ukraine crisis.[20]
    • the Biden administration also granted permission to the Baltic nations (Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia) to transfer U.S.-made equipment to Ukraine.[21][22][23][24] Estonia donated FGM-148 Javelin anti-tank missiles to Ukraine, while Latvia and Lithuania provided FIM-92 Stinger air defense systems and associated equipment.[25] Other NATO members also provided aid to Ukraine. Prexisting UK and Canadian military training programs were bolstered in January 2022, with the British deploying additional military trainers and providing light anti-armor defense systems, and the Canadians deploying a small special forces delegation to aid Ukraine.
  • January 23
  • January 26
    • A Normandy Format meeting was planned between Russian, Ukrainian, German and French senior officials in Paris on 26 January 2022,[28] with a followup phone call between the French and Russian presidents Macron and Putin on 28 January.[29] Ukraine fulfilled Russia's condition for a meeting in Paris and decided to withdraw from Parliament the controversial draft law on the reintegration of the Crimea and Donbas region, because it was viewed that the law was contrary to the Minsk peace agreements.[30][31]

February[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jenkins, Amanda (February 5, 2019). "Copyright Breakdown: The Music Modernization Act | Now See Hear!". blogs.loc.gov. Retrieved January 2, 2020.
  2. ^ "World's largest free trade deal is under way, but what is RCEP?". South China Morning Post. 2022-01-01. Retrieved 2022-01-01.
  3. ^ Shum, Michael (30 December 2021). "Lawmakers prepare for oaths as Leung tipped to keep top post". The Standard. Retrieved 30 December 2021.
  4. ^ David E. Sanger, U.S. Says Russia Sent Saboteurs Into Ukraine to Create Pretext for Invasion Archived 22 January 2022 at the Wayback Machine, New York Times (14 January 2022).
  5. ^ Paul Sonne, Missy Ryan and John Hudson, Russia planning potential sabotage operations in Ukraine, U.S. says Archived 14 January 2022 at the Wayback Machine, Washington Post (14 January 2022).
  6. ^ a b "Russia denies looking for pretext to invade Ukraine". Associated Press. 17 January 2022. Archived from the original on 22 January 2022. Retrieved 22 January 2022.
  7. ^ Michael Schwirtz & David E. Sanger, Russia Thins Out Its Embassy in Ukraine, a Possible Clue to Putin’s Next Move Archived 22 January 2022 at the Wayback Machine, New York Times (17 January 2022).
  8. ^ a b c Matthew Chance, Kylie Atwood, Emmet Lyons & Ami Kaufman, Ukraine warns Russia has 'almost completed' build-up of forces near border Archived 21 January 2022 at the Wayback Machine, CNN (18 January 2022).
  9. ^ Will Russia make a military move against Ukraine? Follow these clues. Archived 22 January 2022 at the Wayback Machine, Atlantic Council (20 January 2022).
  10. ^ "Russia sending more troops to Belarus amid rising tensions with Ukraine – National | Globalnews.ca". Global News. Archived from the original on 19 January 2022. Retrieved 19 January 2022.
  11. ^ "US fears arrival of Russian troops could lead to nuclear weapons in Belarus". France 24. 18 January 2022. Archived from the original on 19 January 2022. Retrieved 19 January 2022.
  12. ^ "Russia moves more troops westward amid Ukraine tensions". ABC News. Archived from the original on 19 January 2022. Retrieved 19 January 2022.
  13. ^ Lejeune, Tristan (18 January 2022). "Russia sends troops to Belarus for war games". The Hill. Archived from the original on 19 January 2022. Retrieved 19 January 2022.
  14. ^ "Secretary Antony J. Blinken at a Press Availability". U.S. Department of State. 21 January 2022. Archived from the original on 22 January 2022. Retrieved 22 January 2022.
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  18. ^ Paul Sonne; John Hudson; Shane Harris (22 January 2022). "U.K. accuses Russia of scheming to install a pro-Kremlin government in Ukraine". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 23 January 2022. Retrieved 23 January 2022.
  19. ^ "Explainer-Who is Yevhen Murayev, named by Britain as Kremlin's pick to lead Ukraine?". Euronews. 23 January 2022. Archived from the original on 23 January 2022. Retrieved 23 January 2022.
  20. ^ "UK warns of Russian 'plot' to replace Ukraine government". Deutsche Welle. 23 January 2022.
  21. ^ Sebastian Sprenger, Baltic states tout US-approved weapon shipments to Ukraine Archived 23 January 2022 at the Wayback Machine, Defense News (21 January 2022).
  22. ^ "Estonia plans to supply Ukraine with heavy weapons". EURACTIV. 3 January 2022. Archived from the original on 3 January 2022. Retrieved 17 January 2022.
  23. ^ "Latvia will send weapons to Ukraine – defense minister". Ukrinform. 6 January 2022. Archived from the original on 18 January 2022. Retrieved 22 January 2022.
  24. ^ "Lithuania ready to supply lethal weapons to Ukraine – minister". LRT. 20 December 2021. Archived from the original on 20 January 2022. Retrieved 21 January 2022.
  25. ^ "Baltic states step up in arming Ukraine against potential Russian incursion". Politico. 21 January 2022. Archived from the original on 21 January 2022. Retrieved 22 January 2022.
  26. ^ "Burkina Faso coup: Return of the military strongmen to West Africa". BBC News. 2022-01-27. Retrieved 2022-01-28.
  27. ^ "Burkina Faso: New leader gives first speech since ousting president". BBC News. 2022-01-28. Retrieved 2022-01-28.
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  29. ^ "Scholz, Macron say diplomacy can fix Ukraine-Russia standoff". Deutsche Welle. 2022-01-25. Archived from the original on 2022-01-25. Retrieved 2022-01-25.
  30. ^ "At Russia's request, Kiev withdrew the law on Crimea and Donbas from parliament". News Fox24. 25 January 2022. Archived from the original on 26 January 2022. Retrieved 26 January 2022.
  31. ^ "Macron plans diplomatic phone call with Putin to calm Ukrainian crisis". The Irish Times. 26 January 2022.
  32. ^ "Russia's reported military action so far". BBC. February 24, 2022. Retrieved February 24, 2022.
  33. ^ "Mahinda Rajapaksa resigns as Prime Minister". www.adaderana.lk. Retrieved 2022-05-23.
  34. ^ "Iraqi leaders vow to move ahead after dozens quit parliament". The Independent. 2022-06-13. Retrieved 2022-06-13.
  35. ^ "Boris Johnson blames 'the herd,' resigns to make way for new U.K. leader". The Washington Post. 7 July 2022. Archived from the original on 7 July 2022. Retrieved 7 July 2022.
  36. ^ "As it happened: Shinzo Abe - suspect used handmade gun to kill ex-Japan leader, say police". BBC News.
  37. ^ "L'Assemblée nationale rejette la motion de censure de gauche, soutenue par seulement 146 députés". LEFIGARO (in French). 2022-07-11. Retrieved 2022-07-11.
  38. ^ Srinivasan, Meera (2022-07-14). "Gotabaya Rajapaksa flies to Singapore, emails resignation letter". The Hindu. Retrieved 2022-07-21.
  39. ^ "Sri Lanka: Ranil Wickremesinghe elected president by MPs". BBC News. 2022-07-20. Retrieved 2022-07-20.
  40. ^ "Sri Lanka's president Gotabaya Rajapaksa officially resigns". The Guardian. 2022-07-15. Retrieved 2022-07-20.
  41. ^ Pathirana, Saroj. "Wickremesinghe sworn in as Sri Lankan president amid protests". www.aljazeera.com. Retrieved 2022-07-21.
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  44. ^ "China to hold 20th CCP Congress on October 16". Al Mayadeen. August 30, 2022.
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  46. ^ "Ishmael Kalsakau elected Vanuatu PM". No. 478078. RNZ. 4 November 2022. Retrieved 5 November 2022.