Caucasian grouse

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Caucasian grouse
Tetras du caucase jogo 0g.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Galliformes
Family: Phasianidae
Genus: Lyrurus
Species:
L. mlokosiewiczi
Binomial name
Lyrurus mlokosiewiczi
Synonyms

Tetrao mlokosiewiczi

in Russia

The Caucasian grouse or Caucasian black grouse (Lyrurus mlokosiewiczi) is a large bird in the grouse family. It is closely related to the black grouse (L. tetrix).

Description[edit]

As with many gamebirds, the cock (male) is larger than the hen (female), measuring 50–55 cm compared to her length of 37–42 cm. The cock is very distinctive, with all-black plumage, apart from red eyebrows, and a long, deeply forked tail. The female Caucasian grouse is grey with dark barring, and has a cackling call.[2]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

It occurs in extreme southeastern Europe and adjacent regions.[3][4] The scientific name of this bird commemorates the Polish naturalist Ludwik Mlokosiewicz. The Caucasian grouse is a sedentary species, breeding in the Caucasus and Pontic Mountains of northeast Turkey and iran on open slopes with low Rhododendron or other scrubs but in proximity to deciduous broad-leaf forest.[4]

Breeding[edit]

They have a group display or lek in May and June. Unlike the male Eurasian black grouse, the Caucasian grouse display is almost mute but for a thin whistling of the cock fluttering his wings as he leaps and turns in the air, producing a flash of white as the underwing feathers are briefly revealed.[2] The hen lays up to ten eggs in a ground scrape and takes all responsibility for nesting and caring for the chicks, as is typical with gamebirds.

Conservation[edit]

It is perhaps the least-studied of all grouse in the world, and it was formerly classified as Data Deficient by the IUCN.[1][5] Recent research shows that it is declining to some extent, and it is consequently listed as a Near Threatened species in 2008[6] with an estimated population of 30,203–63,034 worldwide in 2010.[4] Conservation efforts have included encouraging ecotourism as a way to promote awareness of the bird and its habitat.[7]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b BirdLife International (2016). "Lyrurus mlokosiewiczi". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2016: e.T22679483A92815595. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-3.RLTS.T22679483A92815595.en. Retrieved 11 November 2021.
  2. ^ a b Madge et al. (2002)
  3. ^ Gokhelashvili, R.; Kerry, P.R.; Gavashelishvili, L. (2003). "How much do we know about the Caucasian Black Grouse Tetrao mlokosiewiczi". Sandgrouse. 25 (1): 33–40.
  4. ^ a b c Gavashelishvili, A.; Javakhishvili, Z. (2010). "Combining radio-telemetry and random observations to model the habitat of Near Threatened Caucasian grouse Tetrao mlokosiewiczi". Oryx. 44 (4): 491–500. doi:10.1017/S0030605310000979.
  5. ^ BLI (2004)
  6. ^ BLI (2008)
  7. ^ "Doga Dernegi Caucasian Black Grouse Project". Archived from the original on 21 November 2008. Retrieved 29 August 2009.

Bibliography[edit]