Robert Pitofsky

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Robert Pitofsky
Robert Pitofsky.jpg
Chairman of the Federal Trade Commission
In office
April 11, 1995 – May 31, 2001
PresidentBill Clinton
George W. Bush
Preceded byJanet Dempsey Steiger
Succeeded byTimothy Muris
Commissioner of the Federal Trade Commission
In office
June 29, 1978 – April 30, 1981
PresidentJimmy Carter
Ronald Reagan
Preceded byCalvin J. Collier
Succeeded byGeorge W. Douglas
Personal details
Born(1929-12-27)December 27, 1929
Paterson, New Jersey
DiedOctober 6, 2018(2018-10-06) (aged 88)
Chevy Chase, Maryland
Political partyDemocratic
EducationNew York University
Columbia Law School

Robert Pitofsky (December 27, 1929 – October 6, 2018) was an American lawyer and politician who was the chairman of the Federal Trade Commission of the United States from April 11, 1995, to May 31, 2001.[1] He had previously been Dean of the Georgetown University Law Center from 1983 to 1989, and was Dean Emeritus at the time of his death.[2]

Early life and education[edit]

Born and raised in Paterson, New Jersey,[3] Pitofsky attended Eastside High School.[4] Pitofsky was educated at New York University and the Columbia University School of Law.

Federal Trade Commission (FTC)[edit]

Before becoming chairman of the FTC on April 12, 1995, he previously held positions with the FTC as a Commissioner (1978–1981) and as Director of the Bureau of Consumer Protection (1970–1973).[5] Pitofsky was the primary author of one of the most widely used casebooks in the area of trade regulation, now in its sixth edition.

Personal life[edit]

Pitofsky was married and has three children and seven grandchildren. He died at the age of 88 on October 6, 2018.[6]

Publications[edit]

Books:

  • Cases and Materials on Trade Regulation (Foundation Press 5th ed. 2003) (with others).
  • "How the Chicago School Overshot the Mark" (Oxford Univ. Press 2008) (Pitofsky, ed.).[7]

Articles:

  • "Antitrust at the Turn of the Twenty-first Century: the Matter of Remedies," 91 Geo. L.J. 169 (2002).
  • "Antitrust and Intellectual Property: Unresolved Issues at the Heart of the New Economy," 34 Intell. Prop. L. Rev. 643 (2002), reprinting 16 Berkeley Tech L.J. 535 (2001).
  • "The Essential Facilities Doctrine Under United States Antitrust Law," 70 Antitrust L.J. 443 (2002) (with others).
  • "Challenges of the New Economy: Issues at the Intersection of Antitrust and Intellectual Property". Antitrust Law Journal. 68: 913. 2001.
  • "The Political Content of Antitrust," 127 U. Penn. L. Rev. 1050 (1979).[7]
  • "Beyond Nader: Consumer Protection and the Regulation of Advertising," 90 Harv. L. Rev. 661 (1977).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ List of Commissioners, Chairwomen, and Chairmen of the Federal Trade Commission: 1915–2018 (as of November 2018). Ftc.gov
  2. ^ "From Dean Emeritus Robert Pitofsky to Joseph Simons (L'83), Georgetown Law Celebrates Tradition with Federal Trade Commission Hearings | Georgetown Law". Law.georgetown.edu. Retrieved 2018-10-09.
  3. ^ Kang, Cecilia. "Robert Pitofsky, Champion of Consumer Protection, Dies at 88", The New York Times, October 11, 2018. Accessed April 15, 2021. "Robert Pitofsky was born in Paterson, N.J., on Dec. 27, 1929, to Morris and Sadye Pitofsky. His father fixed textile looms, and his mother sold dresses."
  4. ^ "Robert Pitofsky obituary Quietly determined chairman of the US Federal Trade Commission who challenged some of the most powerful companies in the world, including BP", The Times, November 24, 2018. Accessed April 15, 2021. "Robert attended Eastside High School, on the wealthier side of Paterson, and had a series of part-time jobs: selling potatoes and bananas, working as a lifeguard at the lakes in northern New Jersey, and even becoming a Sunday school teacher."
  5. ^ "Robert Pitofsky". Federal Trade Commission. 2013-07-18. Retrieved 2018-10-09.
  6. ^ "In Memoriam: Dean Emeritus Robert Pitofsky – Georgetown Law". Law.georgetown.edu.
  7. ^ a b ROBERT PITOFSKY. "THE POLITICAL CONTENT OF ANTITRUST". Scholarship.law.upenn.edu. Retrieved October 28, 2021.

External links[edit]