Tetrao

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Tetrao
Temporal range: Early Pliocene to recent
Tetrao urogallus Richard Bartz.jpg
Western capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus)
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Galliformes
Family: Phasianidae
Tribe: Tetraonini
Genus: Tetrao
Linnaeus, 1758
Type species
Tetrao urogallus
Linnaeus, 1758
Species

Tetrao urogalloides
Tetrao urogallus

Tetrao is a genus of birds in the grouse subfamily known as capercaillies. They are some of the largest living grouse.

Taxonomy[edit]

The genus Tetrao was introduced in 1758 by the Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus in the tenth edition of his Systema Naturae.[1] The genus name is the Latin word for a game bird, probably a black grouse.[2] The black grouse was included by Linnaeus in the genus Tetrao but is now placed in the genus Lyrurus.[1][3] The type species was designated as the western capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus) by George Robert Gray in 1840.[4][5]

Species[edit]

The genus contains two species:[3]

Image Scientific name Common Name Distribution
David Palmer Capercaillie.jpg Tetrao urogallus Western capercaillie Europe to western Russia
Tetrao urogalloides.jpg Tetrao urogalloides Black-billed capercaillie eastern Russia as well as parts of northern Mongolia and China

The fossil record of this genus is extensive:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Linnaeus, Carl (1758). Systema Naturae per regna tria naturae, secundum classes, ordines, genera, species, cum characteribus, differentiis, synonymis, locis (in Latin). Vol. 1 (10th ed.). Holmiae (Stockholm): Laurentii Salvii. p. 159.
  2. ^ Jobling, James A. (2010). The Helm Dictionary of Scientific Bird Names. London: Christopher Helm. p. 383. ISBN 978-1-4081-2501-4.
  3. ^ a b Gill, Frank; Donsker, David; Rasmussen, Pamela, eds. (July 2021). "Pheasants, partridges, francolins". IOC World Bird List Version 11.2. International Ornithologists' Union. Retrieved 23 August 2021.
  4. ^ Gray, George Robert (1840). A List of the Genera of Birds : with an Indication of the Typical Species of Each Genus. London: R. and J.E. Taylor. p. 62.
  5. ^ Peters, James Lee, ed. (1934). Check-List of Birds of the World. Vol. 2. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. p. 24.